MacPorts Installation and Sending UDP Messages from the Command Line and Applescript

UPDATE: A very easy tool to send UDP commands can be found here http://packetsender.com/

Spurred on by one of my colleagues, I found a way to be able to send UDP messages from the command line without a lot of fuss. Granted, you do have to install some things on the backend, and any applescript you make wont be able to run on any computer unless this same process has been completed, but it’s still useful if you need to send UDP messages (say to a Pharos/Mosaic/Eos). This was all done in Mountain Lion 10.8.2:

  • Follow the instructions here up to the point where it gets you to install the game – don’t do that. They refer to Darwin Ports everywhere – it’s actually called MacPorts now.
    http://www.nzmac.com/features/how-to/installing-unix-software-on-a-mac/continues.html
  • You can find the install for MacPorts here:
    http://www.macports.org/install.php
  • When in the instructions on the nzmac.com site, it tells you to change to the darwin ports directory, this is the command instead:
    cd /opt/local/var/macports
  • Anytime you see “dports” substitute “macports”.
  • After you’ve gotten through all the above, you’ll want to install the program “socat” which will allow you to send the UDP messages:
    sudo port install socat
  • Once that has installed sucessfully, you should now be able to send UDP messages now like the following. You would replace “HELLO” with the text you wish to send and then change the IP and port number to the device you’re sending to:
    echo "HELLO" | socat – UDP-DATAGRAM:192.168.0.255:5000,broadcast

Now for the actual Applescript, that part is easy, you just have to insert a “do shell script” command into an applescript where you can ask for variables, etc.  Here’s an example:

set UDPstring to the quoted form of "Hello_Does_This_Work"

do shell script "echo " & UDPstring & " | opt/local/bin/socat - UDP-DATAGRAM:192.168.0.255:5000,broadcast"

MacPorts has some other fun things you can install, like Terminal Notifier for instance. Here are some commands to remember:

  • To make sure that your installation is up to date and to upgrade anything you may have installed through MacPorts, run these two commands:
    sudo port -v selfupdate
    port upgrade outdated
  • To search for a particular program or to list all the programs (replace {name} with your search criteria:
    port search {name}
    port list
  • Finally again, to install a new port, the command is:
    sudo port install {portname}

As usual, YMMV and always backup your computer before you do something you’re unsure of.  Good Luck!

-j

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